Everything has it's beauty, but not everyone sees it. - Confucius
Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me
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Friday, 19 June 2009

Sometimes going to work can be exciting.

No, I haven’t gone mad.

While I was off work, I got a phone call from a mate there.
Get here with your camera; you won’t be disappointed!

Easier said than done, but intrigued, when I returned on the Wednesday, minus the camera, I found out why.
A pair of birds had nested under the canopy of one of the loading bays, and whilst all the tooing and frowing of lorries and people in the busy yard was going on, had raised five healthy youngsters.

The next day, after getting permission to bring the camera in from the ‘little’ man in the ‘big’ suite, I returned after my shift, and dodged my way through the delivery lorries and fork lift trucks.
And there it was,

an untidy looking nest of sticks, balanced on the supports of the canopy. The occupants had flown; but not very far. Up on the top of the warehouse roof, one of the youngsters was giving me the once over.

A Kestrel! Amazing to think that throughout all the busy days of a busy business, a pair of Kestrels had managed to raise five healthy babies.
I see Kestrels on a daily basis during my lunch break, hunting the perimeter verges of the warehouse, hovering and swooping over the grass and shrubs. Recently they had seemed busier than usual. And no wonder; a family to feed.

The youngster turned, as I fired off a few shots,
still watching carefully with that large eye, that would soon be looking for his own mice, hiding in the long grass.
He began to exercising his wings, flapping and stretching,


before settling down, perched on the ledge.

‘These won’t be very long before they leave, to set up their own territories’, I thought. But for now, I made the most of this close encounter, and continued taking more pictures.

A couple of drivers wandered over, to look for themselves, at these magnificent birds. And all the time, little faces would appear, and disappear, along the edge of the roof; sometimes calling for a parent; no doubt hungry again. And sometimes, just sit and look at the strange people below.

As I eventually turned to leave, and walk back, one of the youngsters flew down from the roof, and settled on one of the light fittings on the side of the building.

I hurried back for a few more shots, as he sat proudly, chest puffed out, surveying his new kingdom.


It had been my best day at work for a very long time.

20 comments:

  1. wow - that's amazing Keith. What a wonderful find and well done your colleague for the tip off.

    Cracking pictures of a great bird!

    Oh - any vacancies for a couple of days? :D

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  2. I must say, they are a beautiful bird. Somewhat smaller than our Coopers Hawks but more refined looking I would say.

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  3. Thanks Tricia. Yea, they all think I'm a bit mad at times wandering the lakes and places with my camera taking pictures of birds; but good of him, and others, to tip me off about some birds at times.
    Don't know about vacancies, lol, I can never wait to get out of there most days.

    Abe, thank you. They are beauties, and great to watch them hunting, as they hovver, perfectly still, against the wind, with just the wings fluttering.

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  4. Keith...these are amazing photos! How lucky to have them nest so close (and right under your nose practically). I'm glad your friend was observant, and you were able to photograph and experience seeing the babies. They are gorgeous birds. (I hope they stick around for a little bit longer so you can get another round of photos.)

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  5. lovely photos. that would make my working year!

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  6. You are a lucky guy.There must have be so much of excitement in the air for you as well as Kestrels(to pose for you:)).You got some cool shots!Work would be so much fun this way...

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  7. WOW! You really are a bird magnet Keith, they even hunt you out at work!! What an experience and some lovely photos. Now that had to be worth going to work for ;)

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  8. It's great to see these birds making the best of the man-made environment - superb observation Keith, and thanks for sharing it here.

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  9. Thanks Kelly. It was a real treat to see these.

    Pete thanks. It was certainly worth going back to work for.

    Thanks NatureStop. They're getting more adventurous with each day.

    ShySongbird it certainly was worth the return visit to work.

    Rob, thanks. It's good to see how some birds and animals adapt to our intrusions isn't it.

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  10. Brilliant beautiful photos! I loved seeing him fluffed up like that! The Kestrel is my hubby's favorite bird - I showed him these photos and he loved them too!

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  11. oo-oo-ooo

    I like the 2nd and the 9th photos. That 9th one looks so boldly at you :).

    By the way, I've found you by way of Jen. I like your profile photo, it shares an adventurer in you.

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  12. Shelley, thank you. One of my favourite birds too.

    JPT, thanks, yea, work has its good side sometimes :)

    Heather, thanks for stopping by. Glad you enjoyed the pictures; was a real treat to see them like that. Thank you.

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  13. Well documented, Keith. How great to be able to see them at close quarters like that. It is amazing the places some birds choose to build a nest, even very busy places. A few years ago there was a Robin nesting in a cardboard box on top of a pile of junk in a junk shop's outhouse which was locked up every night and during the day customers were in and out all day.

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  14. Thanks John. A lot of birds, thankfully, soon learn to adapt to our intrusions.
    Nice story about the Robin.

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  15. Blimey mate, how nice is that !! Congrats :-)
    We had a fallout of Yellow Wagtails at work once but no Kestrels.

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  16. PS. The Kestrel we have here is similar but the males are a little more colourful.
    They actually take to nest boxes or cavities, so I'm amazed it chose a stick nest !
    I didn't think they built their own nest either..hmmm

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  17. Nick, you're right about their nesting habits. I beleive that stick nest is an old pigeons nest that it used. One of my books mentions that they sometimes use old corvids nests.
    Adaptable lol

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  18. What luck to capture these images !

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  19. Field of View, thank you for stopping by, and commenting, appreciate it.
    It was great to be able to get fairly close to these; and a surprise when I found out they were there too.
    Thanks again :)

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