Everything has it's beauty, but not everyone sees it. - Confucius
Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me
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Monday, 26 April 2010

Ringed and Little Ringed Plover

Ringed Plover
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Latin name: Charadrius hiaticula
Length 18cm
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Ringed Plovers can be told from Little Ringed Plovers by their larger size, pot-bellied appearance, bolder mannerisms and the lack of a yellow eye ring. It is brownish grey above and whitish below. Additionally, the adults have a thick black and yellow bill and brighter orange legs.
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Little Ringed Plover on left, Ringed Plover on right.
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Ringed Plovers also show an obvious pale wing bar in flight, unlike Little Ringed Plovers.
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Not the best of shots, but it does show the wing bar.
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Their Diet consists of, beetles, flies, small molluscs, snails and small crustacea.
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The nest is a Scrape, usually in the open and never far from water; excavated by the male, lined with tiny pebbles, debris and pieces of vegetation.
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Four eggs are laid May to July, and incubation takes 23-26 days. The young fledge after 25 days.
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Adult Ringed Plover

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Little Ringed Plover
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Latin name: Charadrius dubius
Length 15cm
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Little Ringed Plovers look superficially similar to Ringed Plovers but they are smaller and have a distinctively furtive horizontal stance and longer rear-end.
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For confirmation, the adults have all-dark bills, duller, yellower legs and a diagnostic yellow eye ring.
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They first bred in the UK in 1938 and since then have successfully colonised a large part of England and Wales thanks to man-made habitats such as gravel pits.
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Their Diet consists of insects, spiders and other invertebrates, just below the surface of wet ground.
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The Male excavates several scrapes, and one is selected by the female. The nest is usually unlined on bare ground or among low vegetation, rarely far from water and often on small islands in rivers or lakes.
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Four eggs, buffish with brown spots and streaks, are laid between March and June. Incubation takes 24-26 days and the young fledge after 21-24 days.
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Adult Little Ringed Plover

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27 comments:

  1. Brilliant shots all of them Keith, well done.

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  2. Hi Keith,
    That's a very coll message to learn how to distinguish between them. Fortunately we only have the ringed plover around here and they have just come back... Beautiful pictures of both species!

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  3. ...these are both as cute as can be, but that yellow eye ring is stunning. Also...happy belated birthday!! Really cute post on Sunday with the birds singing your birthday song! Hope you had a wonderful day.

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  4. They have made their mark on your life, Keith. The beauty of an images.

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  5. Great shots Keith the close up is my favourite

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  6. Excellent comparative post Keith. We used to see them locally years ago but once the gravel pits became overgrown (lack of management!) their prefered open shingle habitat has been lost.

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  7. I really like theseand little birds with their yellow eye ring. Brilliant shots.
    Sam

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  8. Wow - great pics of this little guy - and very instructive explanations - thanks :)

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  9. Thanks Paul :)

    Kelly, thank you.
    Had a great day yesterday, thanks.

    Thank you Bob. Great little birds.

    Bobbster, thank you. :)

    Thank you Frank. I’m lucky, still a couple of good sights locally for these.

    Thank you Sam :)

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  10. Great shots Keith and very informative.

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  11. Pescalune, almost missed you. Thanks for your comment.

    Linda, thank you. :)

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  12. Great close ups Keith and a very informative write up.

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  13. A great study of the plovers in this post Keith...that eye ring is very clear in that shot!! Yet another wonderful post chock full of great info and photos!!

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  14. What a gorgeous critter. I love those eyes!

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  15. Thank You so much for this informative entry. Aren't they just the most curious little darlin's. Your photos are wonderful.

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  16. Good shots should save me getting confused though I don't guarantee it. Thanks.

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  17. Interesting read, excellent photos!

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  18. Cracking good photos there Keith. Now I can tell the difference, if I get to remember!

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  19. This is the third time of trying to comment Keith so I hope you don't receive multiple comments from me. Last night I kept getting an error report from blogger saying my 'request could not be completed'! Then this morning while trying to re-comment on a different computer I forgot to log in and subsequently lost the comment while doing so, so frustrating especially after being unable to comment for so long anyway!!!

    However what I was trying to say was that this is a most informative post with lovely photos as always.

    I was also very disappointed to miss your Birthday on Sunday so am sending you many belated Birthday good wishes and congratulations on reaching your sixth decade. Here's to the next six! :)

    The photos of the Sedge Warbler in your Birthday post were stunning, really beautiful and so was the Nightingale on the post before. Could it have opened its beak any wider?

    I have never seen a Nightingale but remember my Dad used to talk of how he and Mum cycled for miles one evening when they were courting so that he could take her to a place where he knew one sang regularly. Isn't that romantic?

    I do hope you are continuing to recover Keith. I'm sure getting out in this beautiful sunshine is doing you a power of good :)

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  20. Good shots and an interesting comparison.

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  21. Thanks Trevor. :)

    Thank you Dixxe. :)

    Hilary, thank you. :)

    Dar, thank you for your comment.

    Cheers Adrian. I still get confused lol

    Thank you Sarah :)

    Thanks John. My memory’s had it lol

    Thank you Jan; and the birthday wishes.
    What a romantic your dad was. A lovely memory.

    Thanks Kerry :)

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  22. Great pictures as always, Keith keep them comming

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  23. these are excellent! Loving all of them- that head shot is fantastic. beautiful plover!

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  24. Thank you for your comment Jill. :)

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