Everything has it's beauty, but not everyone sees it. - Confucius
Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me
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Friday, 5 August 2011

Friday Flowers

In the red.



Musk Mallow, Malva moschata. A neater and more elegant relative of the common mallow. A perennial of slightly neglected open grasslands on well-drained soils.




It is found in hedge banks, road verges, lightly grazed pasture, meadows and waste land, flowering from June to August/September.


The flowers of Musk Mallow have a musky smell, hence the common name. They have five petals which are lobed, pale pink with fine, darker pink veins.



 The stems and the lobed leaves are hairy.




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Red Clover, Trifolium pratense. A perennial with trifoliate leaves, which belongs to the family of Leguminosae, and grows in a wide range of grasslands.




Other names for red clover are cow clover, purple clover and bee-bread.
The flowers are variable in colour, from pink to deep red.




A plant much loved by bees, and also used medicinally to treat a number of conditions, including cancer, whooping cough, respiratory problems, and skin inflammations.




Red clover also grows well in grazing land where it binds nitrogen into the soil. Planting red clover will improve the soil because the roots have special nodules that house nitrogen-fixing bacteria. These bacteria can grab nitrogen from the air in the soil and make it available to the plant. When the red clover plant decomposes it makes that nitrogen available to the soil.


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Whatever you are doing, enjoy the upcoming weekend.


34 comments:

  1. Good morning! Could do with some of that clover on my allotment.

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  2. Morning Debs. Yea, it's good stuff that clover; pretty too ;-)

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  3. Great post Keith, very informative and some great images. The second, and especially the third, are stunners. {;o)

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  4. Flowers have sounds attached to them, like Musk Mallow, Bee Orchid and many more. Very good photography Keith.

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  5. The shots of the musk mallow are world beaters.

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  6. Thanks Trevor. Had to dig most of these from the archives; not been out much recently.

    Bob, you are so right about the sound thing. Thanks. :-)

    Thank you Adrian. It's such a lovely plant; I'd like a garden full of it.

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  7. Beautiful flowers... :) Very nicely taken...

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  8. The Musk Mallow looks a lovely little plant, especially with the water droplets on it.

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  9. lovely images. loved the mallow shot with the bug in the background. :)

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  10. John, it's a real delicate looking flower. Thanks.

    Thanks Theresa. they're such a lovely plant to photograph.

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  11. HI Keith...Mallow is a lovely and hardy plant ,and can show up for years then it's gone ...thats what happened to those that where growing in my area.....
    Red clover.. as kids we used to pull out a piece and suck a sweet sap out of the end...hmmm maybe that's the medicine I need ; }}
    Nice Flower Friday...!!
    HUGS!!

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  12. It always seems to be Friday when I come wandering on to your site and am greeted with the most lovely flowers! Bee-bread is just a wonderful name for red clover.

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  13. Amazing shots! Love the clover up close!

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  14. I always enjoy the pictures you take. The wildlife, ducks,birds, etc... To see some of your other work is refreshing. Keep it coming.

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  15. Wonderful images Keith...
    I really admire your knowledge of our wild plants...

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  16. Thanks Grace. The Mallow is one of my favourites.

    Thanks Andrea. Glad you enjoyed them.

    Thank you Idrani :-)

    Thanks Robin :-)

    David, thank you :-)

    Thanks Andrew :-)

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  17. What hasn't already been said about your stellar photos of these often overlooked flowers? Red clover happens to be one of my favorites, and I let it bloom wherever it wants in my yard, cutting it down only when it dies back. It makes a great cancer fighting tea, too!

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  18. These are beautiful images! I love the musk mallow shots!

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  19. I love the water droplets on the Musk Mallow. Beautiful, all of them.

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  20. I live in a marshy area, with pastures creating for cattle by a dyke system first built in the 1700s. We have musk mellow (though I didn't know what it was called till now) flowering by the roadside along the ditches and, of course, clover all over the place. I used to love picking the little petals off the clovers when I was a kid and sucking the sugar from their ends. How wonderful that they're also known as "bee bread"! I've learned such a lot here today about things I normally take for granted.

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  21. Thank you Karen

    Thank Pat :-)

    Thank you Elizabeth :-)

    louciao, thank you. Seems that both you and Grace had a sweet tooth for the clover ;-)

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  22. My favorite is #3; the focus is perfect. Too bad I can't smell this post.

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  23. Thanks JoLynne.
    A scented internet; that sounds rather good :-)

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  24. Your photos are terrific, the Musk Mallow is with the water droplets is quite nice. The Red Clover series is great, I really like the close-up.

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  25. Thanks Larry. Glad you enjoyed them. :-)

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  26. Lovely! Didnt know that about the Red Clover! Great info and great close up shots!

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  27. Simply beautifully captured shots...lovely!

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  28. Thanks Sondra. I learn so much myself every time I research for a post. :-)

    Kalyan, thank you :-)

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  29. Lovely images. I particularly like the third Mallow shot Keith. Perfection.

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  30. Thanks Roy. I was pleased with that one :-)

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