Everything has it's beauty, but not everyone sees it. - Confucius
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Friday, 4 November 2011

Friday Flowers

Yarrow, Achillea millefoliam


Yarrow is a perennial herb native to Europe and Asia, and naturalised in North America and most other countries throughout the world.
Its botanical name is derived from Achilles, the Greek hero.

It flowers from June to September; the flowers are white or pale lilac, being like minute daisies, in flattened, terminal, loose heads, or cymes.



The plant is rich in magnesium, calcium and phosphate. Sheep eat the plant when it is young, and for this reason it is sometimes included in grass seed mixtures. It is said to control diarrhoea in sheep. Yarrow has many herbal uses, but can cause skin irritation and rashes.




Yarrow is a very valuable medicinal herb, with much scientific evidence of use in alternative medicine as an antiseptic, antispasmodic, astringent, carminative, diaphoretic, digestive, emmenagogue, stimulant, and tonics, vasodilator, and vulnerary. 
Yarrow is used against colds, cramps, fevers, kidney disorders, toothaches, skin irritations, and haemorrhages, and to regulate menses, stimulate the flow of bile, and purify the blood. 
Medicinal tea is a good remedy for severe colds and flu, for stomach ulcers, amenorrhoea, abdominal cramps, abscesses, trauma and bleeding, and to reduce inflammation.



It was one of the herbs dedicated to the Evil One, in earlier days, being sometimes known as Devils Nettle, 
Devil's Plaything, Bad Man's Plaything, and was used for divination in spells.





Other names include, Milfoil, Old Man's Pepper, Soldier's Woundwort, Knight's Milfoil, Thousand Weed, Nose Bleed, Carpenter's Weed, Bloodwort, and Staunchweed.



Enjoy your day


21 comments:

  1. Thanks for this Keith. Most informative. It is a pretty plant.

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  2. Thanks Adrian. I certainly learnt a lot about it after doing the research.

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  3. Very interesting post Keith,It sounds like it's the perfect cure all!...[;o)

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  4. Interesting post. Your Yarrow looks a bit like Queen Anne's Lace...at least, in the photos.

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  5. oh, that last unfurled shot is gorgeous!

    i like yarrow for its toughness. i bought 2 colorful varieties at our local landscape place this spring (yellow and purple blooms). sadly, the Texas extreme heat this summer killed one - even as tough as they are and with daily waterings...

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  6. Thanks for a look at an herb I'm pleased to grow in my garden. I never knew it was used in spells (I think I'll just stick to growing it).

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  7. Maybe I should try some of this Trevor lol

    It does look similar Linda.

    Thanks Theresa. I can imagine a swathe of those colours mixed, would look spectacular.

    Thanks JoLynne. Yea, it's surprising how many herbs, have had somewhat unusual uses in the past.

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  8. I just had to look up the differences between yarrow and Queen Anne's lace because I thought they might have been one and the same, also. They're not but that last shot in particular sure looks like a QAL seed head. Beautiful images, Adrian.

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  9. Doh.. I meant Keith, of course. I was just looking at Adrian's mug above when I was typing. ;)

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  10. Thanks Hilary. They do look a bit similar.

    I can understand the name confusion too, after looking at that fine figure of a gentleman lol

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  11. Well, I didn't know that before.

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  12. Such exquisite blooms, and so helpful too :)

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  13. Lovely pictures and I didn't know Yarrow did all those things. Thanks, very interesting.

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  14. Love Yarrow its such a nice plant for the flower bed...

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  15. Thanks Bob.........me neither :-)

    Thank you Gemel.

    Thanks Gillian. Seems to be a 'cure all' plant.

    Thank you Sondra.

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  16. What a lot of medicinal heritage people have lost with urbanisation. Some of us still have the tradition in our blood but how can one expect people who have been brought up to believe that milk comes from a carton and anything that grows outside a garden fence to be a weed, to understand the medicinal uses of herbs?

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  17. Arija, I completely agree. A lot of the good things from our past are in danger of being lost.

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  18. Lovely botanicals. Do you know that when the Queen Anne's lace is in open bloom, you can stand them stems in water with food coloring. They will suck it up and turn color. It's an amusing thing to do with kids. Uh, wait - kids? That would be me I guess! Try it next summer.

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  19. Thanks Robin. Fascinating bit of information. :-)

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  20. Great serie, 1st and 4th are very nice and would make nice large print's ;)

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  21. Thanks Dominic. My two favourites also.

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