Everything has it's beauty, but not everyone sees it. - Confucius
Sometimes the picture doesn't have to be perfect; it's the captured moment that counts. - me
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Saturday, 13 August 2016

Whatever happened to white dog poo?



August already. Where has the year gone?




Here's a young Wren. I found a family of them while out with Whisky a couple of days ago.






And a young Redstart








I've given the macro lens a bit of an outing recently too.




A bee on a Teasel

Great plants Teasels. Bees and Hoverflies love them as they start to come into flower, and when they've finished, the birds move in for the seed; especially Goldfinches. More people should always find room in their gardens for Teasels.









I found lots of these in a very boggy field. A tiny electric blue leaf hopper called Cicadella viridis, or Green Leaf Hopper.




Staying in the boggy field I came across some of this.




Cranberry.







At the top right of this picture is a berry beginning to form.








And here's a developed berry.





Another 'berry' plant;





Bilberry





A couple of plants that seem to be everywhere at the moment:




Rosebay Willowherb






Common Ragwort





A plant that used to be very common in crop fields once upon a time.




Corncockle


These days you are more likely to come across them in wild flower seed mixes.
Judging by the amount of chemicals farmers spray on their crops these days I can see the Poppy coming to the same fate.
Farmers .......... they have the cheek to call themselves guardians of the countryside. Wankers.




Here's a picture that I couldn't resist taking.




Well, it amused me.




I've been seeing a few of these recently.



Gatekeeper, enjoying a Coreopsis flower in the garden.





And finally, the garden has a new resident at the moment.




A Feral Pigeon.


He doesn't seem to be able to fly, or walk without falling over. He may have crashed into the window and injured himself, so I don't hold out much hope for his well being, or long life, given the number of fucking cats that visit here at night and shit everywhere.





Well, I couldn't end without a picture of Whisky, so.




Whisky and one of his brothers, Obi.






 and his other brother, Thistle.








.....and the white dog poo?

It's partly down to what dogs eat these days. The white is the calcium that's left behind after the water evaporates and the organic stuff is consumed by bugs, slugs and others.
Tighter regulations on dogs crapping on pavements these days means that a lot is bagged and disposed of, so it doesn't hang around like it used to and doesn't get the opportunity to dry out and turn white.


Crap, innit.



11 comments:

  1. The leafhopper is a grand find. Good to see Whiskey fit, happy and alert.

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  2. The macros are awesome!! I tried to transplant a thistle as we call it, but it died...so Ill try collecting some seed this fall...I agree they are the perfect plant. Whisky and his bros look awesome!

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  3. Thanks Adrian. The colour of the leafhopper was striking. Never seen one that colour before, and very small too.

    Sondra, the Teasel or thistle are best grown from seed. They can be tricky to transplant but I did manage to get some to grow in Wales last year, where I stay. This year they have been full of bees, so well worth it.

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  4. I did wonder where you were going with the white dog poo. The sign did make me smile also. it was lovely seeing all the things you found when you were out with your macro lens especailly all that wild fruit. Don't think I have even seen a wile cranberry or bilberry. But the photographs are albsolutely GORGOUES. Whiskey must really miss them when you leave Wales each time. Have a wonderful Sunday.

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  5. Such beautiful images!
    I love the electric blue leaf hopper, such a magnificent creature. I have never seen one before.

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  6. Tempus fugit...as they say!

    Interesting selection of images Keith, you'll have to be careful you don't get trench foot playing about in that boggy ground!

    Best keep an eye on those 'berries' you might be able to forage the makings of a nice healthy breakfast?

    The 'boys' are looking well...[;o)

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  7. Whisky is so pretty, he is well turned out. And the Common Redstart is my favourite.

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  8. Magnificent Wren photo Keith.
    Tried a couple of times to grow teasel seeds but failed. As they were from a local plant maybe they were not viable.
    The pooches steal the show again.

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  9. Thank you Margaret. Whisky has a great time with his brothers in Wales, so much space and freedom to run around.
    It was the first time I'd managed to find Cranberry and the fruit was a bonus.

    Merisi, thank you. It was the first time I'd seen one of these tiny hopppers too. Once I found one though, I started to see a lot more in the boggy vegetation.

    Cheers Trev. Some parts of the bog were a bit too deep to venture into, even with welly's on. Scuba gear next time. As the dogs were racing around there, I could feel the ground I was standing on shaking. Very unstable.

    Thanks Bob. Whisky's long hair is a nightmare to keep tidy. He gets lots of knots that sometimes I have to cut out, and he hates being brushed. He's hard work at times, but worth it.

    Thanks John. Teasel seems to have a habit of growing where you don't need it. Moving seedlings can be tricky and not always successful. Once you've got some to grow though you'll start to get plenty in the future. Worth persevering with.

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  10. That would be a good thing to bring up with your M.P. and get white dog poo brought back, down this way they seem to pick it up ,put it in a small black crap bag, walk on down their way of travel and when out of sight, throw it in the hedge. Lovely set of photos by the way.

    peter

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  11. Thanks Peter, but I'm afraid my local MP is too busy slaughtering Grouse at the moment.
    The dog poo bag was probably one of the worst things that ever happened in the name of Health and Safety. Much better to let the crap degrade naturally at the edge of the path or in the bushes and tell kids not to touch. :-)

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